POLST: The New Generation For Advance Healthcare Directives? - New York Estate Planning News

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POLST: The New Generation For Advance Healthcare Directives?

While this blog has covered the advance healthcare directive (also known as a living will) before, the New York Times sheds some light on a new type of living will. It is called "Physicians Orders For Life Sustaining Treatment."

It is also known as POLST. You can ask a NY estate attorney more about POLST, but you may have to use a different acronym. It is known as a MOLST in New York. MOLST allows physicians to honor a patient's wishes regarding cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and other life-sustaining treatment. It is seen as a unified form that is intended to be used in all medical care settings.

The New York Times reports that the use of such a healthcare directive is effective in preventing unwanted medical treatment but still allows for pain management.

While living wills do state whether or not a patient wants to be on life support, there are plenty of medical treatment options that are simply not covered in living wills and DNRs. In essence, a New York estate planning lawyer can tell you that a MOLST would cover medical treatment when the patient has a pulse or the patient is breathing.

If you are a New Yorker, you should learn more about living wills in general. In New York state, you can appoint a healthcare proxy with a form that you can find online. For those who want to draft a more comprehensive plan for healthcare, there is also a MOLST form online. You don't need a New York estate planning lawyer in order to fill the form out which is good news for New Yorkers in a financial bind.

It is a good way to ensure that healthcare professionals are aware of your wishes when it comes to medical treatment. For more information, please visit our Related Resources links. If you have specific questions about MOLSTs, you may want to meet with your personal physician to explain medical terms and call a NY estate attorney in order to parse out the legal implications.

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